Writing a biography or an autobiography

By Tiffany Colter

I’ve regularly edit memoirs, biographies and autobiographies. I think studying the lives of others is a great way to learn and I personally read about a 3-4 books about the lives of successful people each year. In doing this I’ve learned what really makes a great bio/autobiography and what can really mess one up. I’ve listed a few things here to help you.

 

1. Remember it is about life lessons, not gossip.

It is tempting to share a bunch of stories that are meaningful to you because you like the stories, but that really isn’t the point of a biography. A biography will share information about a life—or a period of time in someone’s life—but the purpose is generally to share lessons that can be learned from that life. If I just told you about planting a garden on Saturday, it is nothing more than a story. It may be interesting, but it won’t change you. The story won’t stick with you any more than any of the other stories you hear that day. If, however, I tell you that the day I planted the garden marked seven years from the toughest struggle our family faced and that seven years ago we had no food, that story of a garden starts to have more meaning. If I tell you even more about the circumstances and how that seven years has changed me, those lessons will stick with you. Have a reason for the story. Don’t just tell random things.

 

2. Focus on the lesson and use illustrations.

This ties in to the first thing and that is you can add random stories if they are illustrations. Honestly the best example of that that I’ve seen is a book called “My Wish” by Mary Gustafson. I had the pleasure of editing this book. It is the authorized biography of Bhante Sujatha, a prominent Buddhist Monk. Her story did an incredible job of sharing random snippets of this Monk’s life and contrasting it to the life he now lives. Even if I hadn’t edited this book, I would recommend it for its unique style and beautiful craft.

When you are working on your own book, consider the lesson you want to make in each book, each chapter and each scene. Then make sure the illustration you’ve selected will help you do that.

 

3. The book doesn’t have to be a straight chronology…and it really shouldn’t be one.

Don’t feel like you need to start at a person’s birth and go the whole way through their life. Look at the key lessons that make this person’s life worth knowing about and then select the stories that will do that. Put the stories in an order that makes sense and that will lead up to driving home the LESSON and then let that be your chronology. That may mean that you sometimes jump around a bit in their life. That is okay, as long as the reader can follow. Other times this will be a straight chronology. That is fine too, as long as you don’t try to tell us about everything that happened during that time. Pick out key events and focus on those.

 

4. Be truthful.

Don’t get tempted to embellish, make up, tweak, or otherwise write something that is a lie. I understand that creative non-fiction allows for building dialog that may not be word for word what was said. That is not what I mean here. I mean, if you never hit the winning homerun in little league. Don’t say you did. If you don’t remember the exact words your dad said to you on graduation day that is fine. To say you were 5th in your class when you were really somewhere in the top 20 is a lie. By extension, if you had a very small graduating class [like a homeschooling group] where you were #3 of 10, don’t—unless it was clear you were joking—say that you were in the top 3%. It may be truthful, but you’re attempting to mislead. We may remember the memoir “A Million Little Pieces” where Oprah laid in to an author who lied about his memoir. Don’t be that guy!!!

 

5. Get permission.

If you are talking about someone by name, it is generally best to get their permission. If you are discussing siblings or parents or others who would be VERY easily identifiable by scanning your Facebook page, it is best to at least let them know they’re mentioned. If they are shown in a negative light…you might want to ask a lawyer what you need to concern yourself with in using them. My goal here isn’t to give legal advice—that isn’t my area. I’m simply telling you that it is generally smart to give people a heads up…and get their permission in writing to save yourself possible legal issues down the road.

 

I hope this will help you with not only writing biographies and memoirs, but also using illustrations in all of your books and stories. The key is to keep the story interesting, connect with the reader, and don’t ramble [these are all dangers when dealing with a person’s life].

And if you’d like to know more about Mary Gustafson’s book, “My Wish”, email me using the contact page on my website, and I’ll be happy to put you in contact with her. This isn’t a paid advertisement. Just a proud endorsement. Smile.

 

See you next time, Tiff

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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What about Crowd funding for my book?

By Tiffany Colter

 

Now this is a really interesting topic. I have talked about it previously and there are lots of websites that will teach you about crowd funding. I just want to point out a few times when crowd funding might be a good option.

1. If you have a book that will reach a specific demographic that is underrepresented.

Sometimes there are topics that have a readership that is a bit small for a publisher to reach. For example, I’m the mom of a deaf teenager. That demographic is certainly large, but not large enough to catch the eye of a traditional publisher. If I wanted to write a book that reaches that specific group and need funding—of a few thousand dollars—crowd funding could be a good option for me.

2. You are already recognized in the book you wish to reach.

Maybe you speak regularly on a topic and people are clamoring for you to finish your book. Unfortunately, you don’t have the time to finish the revisions yourself and you don’t have the money right now to pay someone. This would be another great way crowd funding could work. By offering a copy of the book as an incentive for donating—and possibly personal coaching for higher donations—you can overcome that hurdle to put together a book that others want.

3. You don’t need much money to hit the next step.

Although many times crowd funding is in the thousands, your need might be only a few hundred dollars. In that case, you might need 20 donors or less—a relatively low need in the grand scope.

4. If you have time to commit to it.

Like anything else, this will take time. During the week or more that you have your fundraiser going, you need to contact people, get the word out, and follow-up. Not only that, but if you get the funding, you must take whatever time will be necessary to get the project done. If you take the money and don’t deliver, that is fraud. Don’t do that.

If after reading this you really think you need to look further in to it, I would encourage you to do that. I’ve had a number of clients cross the final financial hurdle by using crowd funding. Now they have their books done and selling. For them it was the difference between being able to finish their book and not finishing at all.

Set a reasonable expectation. Create incentives others would want. Remember to take in to account fees. Research successful campaigns. Commit to the time necessary to get it done. Then go for it.

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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How do I know what to charge for my writing?

By Tiffany Colter

Clients often ask me during coaching sessions how much they should charge for various kinds of writing. This isn’t an easy question because there are so many different factors. I also tend to charge on the low side of average, so when I post my rates I sometimes make people mad. So, let me give you a few things to consider when deciding what to charge for your writing.

 

1. Volume

If I’m writing a blog of 200 words, I will charge more per word than I do if I’m ghostwriting a book. That is because there is a certain amount of research and learning that goes in to becoming familiar with any topic. In a book that is spread out over more words—even though you need a deeper understanding for a book than a blog. The fact is you need to be compensated for your time writing—and part of writing is the research.

 

2. Kind of writing

Are you being asked to completely come up with the topic and material yourself or are you being given a rough draft that needs to be substantially rewritten? I charge about 3 times as much to write a book from notes and interviews as I do to write a book that is in rough draft form and needs a considerable amount of rewriting. And on that, when I’m rewriting I charge by the word count before or after WHICHEVER IS MORE. That is because if I am tightening up the writing, I am still rewriting. If a book is REALLY wordy, I may delete 27 words and rewrite it in 12, but I still did considerable work. Likewise, if a book simply doesn’t go deep enough and needs to have a considerable amount of information added, I’m not going to be unpaid for all the content I added.

 

3. By the word or by the hour?

There are different schools of thought on whether you should charge by the word or by the hour. I prefer by the word, so I can give the client a reasonable idea of what they will pay. You need to decide what will work best for you. The key is to give a quote that is a reasonably good estimate that will be no more than 10%+/- what you quote. If you say it will be about $1,000 and you see it will be $1,100, let them know as soon as you realize this, but it is in the margin. If you see it will be $1,500, then either they didn’t give you a reasonable representation [in which case you will need to explain this to them and let them know the additional fee] OR you did a poor job of estimating and I wouldn’t go above the $1,100.

Bottom Line:

Can I really make money at my writing? Go back to my March 18th blog to see a bit more on a related topic, but the fact is many people earn a reasonable living at writing. The only difference is the usual article, newspaper; magazine route isn’t always the way. Now it is more web content, newsletters and marketing copy.

Know what you need to earn. Make sure you’re able to produce at a reasonable pace to earn that. Find a few key clients you can focus on [remember my June 10th blog] and develop your skills.

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Using your book as a marketing device

By Tiffany Colter

 

Some of you may scoff at that title, but continue reading to understand what I’m trying to explain. I’m not saying that you slap out some horrible work of writing just to make a buck. I have seen those books full of crazy fonts and trite comments. They irritate me and I wouldn’t ever tell you to write those. Actually, if you follow what I’m saying in this blog, you’ll do just the opposite because you’ll realize that a book can be your best calling card and way to build business and speaking events.

Think about when you hear a great speaker. It can be at a business event, a church revival, a seminar on parenting or any other event where someone is teaching about something and you want to know more. How do you feel if you learn a whole bunch in that 45 minutes or hour, but at the end you find out they have NO materials, NO website, NO handouts of any kind? You are left wanting more, but a month later you won’t. In fact, you will probably have totally forgotten that person.

On the other hand, you go to a seminar on a topic of interest and the person has one book that costs $10 on their back table. You learned so much you want to see what else they have on the topic. You look at their book and see it is well laid out with a series of steps, some charts. If it is a novel you see the font is normal and the pages look nice. You buy the book. You will likely read some of it—if not all of it—over the next couple of weeks. Then, months later, if you are talking about that topic with another friend you’ll say, “Oh, I went to a great seminar by that topic. I have their book. You should read it.” They then either tell them the title [so the friend could buy it] or they loan it to their friend. Either way, you have a new reader, a new person to attend your event, a new blog follower, and likely someone who will buy your next book.

This is what I mean by using a book as a marketing device. Make sure you’ve written a great book [notice I didn’t say a PERFECT book. Too many people never do anything because they decide nothing they do is ever good enough] that represents you well and has your contact information on it. Then let that book promote you when you’re not around. I truly believe great, informative [or entertaining] writing is the best possible marketing. If that wasn’t the case I wouldn’t spend hours each month researching and writing all of these blogs.

You did know this is marketing for me, right?

See you next week. Tiff

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Making a Personal Connection with your Reader

By Tiffany Colter

 

I made a mistake a few years back. See, as I talked about in my blog last week our definition of success will influence the way we work to build up our writing business. While I’ve always focused on doing great work for my clients, in my business development plan I was focused on making the company itself bigger and bigger. That is because I really thought clients would see me as more successful—and thus more credible—if I employed more people. Therefore, I built up a company in only 4 years from non-existent to employing 12 people [including subcontractors and interns]. While it was extremely gratifying for me to help all of these people earn money doing what they loved, I no longer loved it. Also, it was harder for me to make that personal connection with readers and writers. Thankfully, it didn’t take me too long [under a year] to realize that I was chasing the wrong goal and return to my passion.

Your example will likely be different from mine, but the results are the same. When we fail to make that personal connection with our reader [or with writers, if you’re a coach/editor like me] then you’re setting yourself up for disappointment, and possibly, failure.

So, what do we do if we either have lost that personal connection or we don’t think we’ve gotten it yet? Here are some things I’ve learned:

 

1. Bigger isn’t better!

No one cared how many people I had on staff. They wanted to know how much I cared about them and their project. I cared a great deal, however, taking the time to talk to each person simply became overwhelming. With that many people working for me—and earning from the stuff between MY ears—I was working a job just to pay people. I am very good at many things, but that doesn’t mean I should do all of them. You may have eight different books fighting for your attention. Or maybe your goal is to do seminars every month with lots of books, CD’s, workbooks, and handouts. You won’t be able to do it all at once, so focus on doing that one thing at a time. We are creative beings. We have lots of ideas. Get one done…then the next. Otherwise you’ll get none done. You have a person or a group of people who are going to benefit from your book. Think of them. Focus on making the connection with them. Then move on to the next thing.

2. Know who wants to know what you know.

This ties in to the previous point. You really need to know the person you’re trying to reach personally. You need to care about what they need. That doesn’t mean you have to get emotional and sappy about it. What I mean is you need to make their needs a priority. This isn’t just about what you want to say, but what your reader wants to know. That may mean additional research is necessary or you need to leave out a few things you wanted to add to keep the book from getting too long and bogged down, but by making a personal connection with your reader through your book and its focus you can get readers who are much more excited about your book and more willing to tell others.

3. Work with people.

You need to get out of your comfort zone and circle of friends and find the people who will read what you’re writing. We can get comfortable in our mutual admiration societies and only write to our little group. If that is your target market, great, but if you want to expand beyond that then you’re going to need to get around other people and find out their wants, needs, and questions.

 

Here is a little exercise that might help you see how easy this really works. I have a few major groups of readers of my blog: Aspiring novelists, professional novelists, non-fiction writers, business consultants/experts who use books as a product at their seminars, and editors. Why don’t you scan some of my blogs to see how I reach out and connect with each of those key readers?

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Chaos is not a success principle and other things that will help you

By Tiffany Colter

 

That sentence was a real revelation to me. I mean that sincerely. Growing up it seemed that all the successful people I saw on TV had beepers [yes, I’m dating myself], cell phones, worked long hours and constantly had someone trying to get their attention. I really, genuinely thought that the busier you were, the more successful you were. I tried to orchestrate my life in such a way that NO moment of usable time was every wasted. From dawn to dusk, I scheduled my life to beyond its breaking point because I knew that successful people always had something going on.

Unfortunately, when you build your life on that warped sense of thinking you are setting yourself up for a fall. My crash and burn was gradually over the course of three years. I had managed to book myself so full of activities: work, kids, household, volunteering, judging, writing…..that I had no time for anything, I was miserable and I was not good at any of it. In fact, the only days I allowed myself to be off were days when I was sick. Around that time I began to develop chronic headaches on Fridays [which forced me to work Saturdays]. I believe this was my body screaming for me to stop [and my stubborn resistance to stopping].

I share this because there is a very important lesson here. You will draw to you your definition of success. If you view success as having a nice car, you will work until you have a nice car. If you view success as respect of others, you will work until you have the success of others. If you view success as being in constant demand with an out of control work schedule, you will have just that. If you view success as dinner on the table every night by 5:30 p.m., you will work to achieve that.

Therefore, you would be well served to look at what you’ve been prioritizing and accomplishing and do some real thinking about what it reveals as your definition of success. When I looked at my life, I realized that Chaos had always been a part of the way that I had structured my life. It was a circumstance that I created. That was because I’d built that in my mind as a success principle. Those kinds of beliefs sabotage our path to success. That is because I was willing to reduce my rates and do things for free in order to make sure I was “always successful”. All of us do it.

Now that I have redefined success for myself, I am drawn to working with fewer clients on long-term projects and offering my coaching products to everyone else. I have decided that my goal is to work 20 hours a week, not 60, so that I’m available when my kids need me or my husband needs me. That is because in 7 years they’ll be gone to their adult lives and I realize this time is limited. Also, my husband works full-time and goes to school. I have a career that allows me to be flexible like that, so I will take advantage of it.

Look at yourself and what you really want to do vs. what you actually are doing. We are all really great at talking about what we’re working on or what we’d like to do, but very few follow through and accomplish things. It is emotionally difficult to put yourself out there by letting a project go and risk rejection, but fear is necessary for growth and you must leave your comfort zone if you’re going to make progress.

You will have to come to terms with the horrible mistakes you’ve made along the way. That was very painful for me. Even in the last few days, I had to face another area I thought I’d conquered, but really still had control of me. Admitting we don’t have it all figured out can be difficult, but is also necessary to make progress.

So, this week start watching yourself. See what you feel you need to justify. Do you feel guilty watching a TV program with your kids? Or do you feel guilty if you tell your kids NO. Do you feel that you should always work late or do you feel guilty when you work on writing? What pushes your “guilty” button? What kind of person do you watch with envy? Who do you aspire to emulate and what is it about them that attracts you? These are all clues to your definition of success as well as the possible extremes that are blocking your success. Discovering the good and the bad opens the balance necessary to take time to write as well as the strength to put that writing out there.

Until next time,

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Make sure every chapter in your book has a reason to be there

By Tiffany Colter

Whether you’re writing a fiction or non-fiction book, every chapter must have a purpose or it is wasting space that is slowing down the pace of your book and disconnecting the reader. Don’t ever give them a reason to put your book down.

 

For Non-Fiction

In each chapter, write down the key lesson you want to convey to the reader. Then write down a key action you want them to take as a result of reading that chapter. After you write the chapter, go back and make sure that all of those points were covered and you didn’t run down rabbit trails. If you did, either delete them or move them to their own chapter. This is how you keep each chapter on topic. If you really feel you need to mention something else then MENTION it, but then say, “We’ll cover this in more depth in chapter 5. For now, the key is to recognize how this plays a part in the process…” and then continue. You can’t fit everything in one chapter and trying to will confuse the reader and make your book less effective.

 

For Fiction

For fiction, it is a similar idea, but you won’t clearly state the reason for each chapter to the reader [fiction is far more subtle than that]. In fiction, you must write down what part in the plot, character arc, story development, etc. that particular scene or chapter will make. Maybe we’re going to meet a character who will be critical to the plot later. Maybe it is a red herring. Whatever it is, write it down and after you’ve written that scene make sure you accomplished your goal. Then make sure you aren’t bashing the reader over the head with it. Make sure the scene flows like a story and doesn’t draw attention to itself.

 
If you maintain these lists either in your outlining or as you write then when you revise you can make sure that the book has the right flow and development. It may seem a simple idea, but most great ideas are simply.

 
Now, go have some fun writing.

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Reading a book vs. Watching a movie

By Tiffany Colter

When I edit manuscripts, I have noticed that many writers try to describe a scene like they’ve seen in a movie. They will be in a point of view character and their eyes will “widen with fright/surprise”. Maybe they will sit up suddenly or put their hand up to indicate anger.

These areas all things that we see in movies, but can you tell me why they don’t translate well when you’re writing a book? It is because they are VISUAL. If I’m the point of view character, I AM that character.

When I (Tiffany) am startled, I am not aware of my own eyes unless I look in a mirror. Instead, I usually feel heat across my chest and radiating down my arms. If I were the point of view character in a scene in order to help the reader experience my fear I’d need them to feel that heat, not see my eyes.

Likewise, if I were to jump or sit up quickly I wouldn’t SEE myself do it, I’d feel the motion of standing. I’d think something inside. If I’m angry, maybe I’m thinking, “There is NO way I’m letting him do that.” As I stand up from my chair. It wouldn’t be the action of standing that would convey my anger, it would by my thoughts and my physiological [body] response to the anger I feel.

This is a subtle thing, but it is huge when you’re writing. You have to become that character if you want your reader to become that character. When revising your scenes look at motions and reactions of the POV character and if you realize you’re watching them from the outside stop and move inside your character and revise so we are in them.

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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Creating Focal Points in your scenes

By Tiffany Colter

Today’s writing tip will help you to build a scene in a way that makes the reader SEE it vividly without describing every single detail.

First, set up the general scene. For our example, let’s make it an emergency room.

Next, the perception of the main character. This will vary based on the character’s personality, why they are there and other factors you build in. Let’s take two different perspectives: A resident on his first day and a mom with a child who won’t wake up, but is breathing.

Layer it with the emotion of the moment. What will the resident feel? What will the mom feel? What are their worries etc.

Then a few “focal points”. These can be people, objects, sounds, smells, or anything that will anchor the reader to the scene. Different characters will notice different things. And when we are nervous or under pressure what we notice will be very different.

Now, build the scene. I will put a few lines below just to create an example. This is a VERY rough draft. I’m trying to show you the idea, it is yours to refine.

She should have been paying more attention. Beth stood to the side watching the swarm of people hovering around her baby. No! That baby had a name. They were hovering around Bradley. She’d felt as if she would vomit when he wouldn’t wake up. He’s only eight weeks old. Her mom had said. Babies do that sometimes.

Thankfully she hadn’t listened. She’d kept trying. After the miscarriage and the months of trying, maybe she was a little more protective. But she’d been right. A nurse glanced up at Beth a couple of times, his eyes unreadable. Was he trying to reassure her or prepare her for the worst? There were three nurses there, the man and two women, and she was glad for all the help Bradley was getting.

***

David’s first day of residency and already he questioned his decision to go in to medicine. He’d thought it would be about helping people and saving lives, but after 2 ½ hours all he’d done was apologize for the wait, be verbally abused by someone wanting a fix, and dealt with some sore throats and other minor ailments that should have gone to their PCP. Emergency medicine wasn’t about traumas and heart attacks. It was paperwork and –.

“Dr. Ross?”

David turned and saw the attending, Dr. Meade. What had David forgotten to do this time?

“We’re working an unresponsive infant in room two.”

“Okay.” He said, his voice coming out a squeak. He cleared his throat. “I’m coming.”

It had to be bad to go to room two. He walked quickly without breaking in to a run. Real medicine wasn’t like television where doctors ran and nurses yelled and you rode stretchers down the hall doing chest compressions the whole way. At least not normally. When it was a pediatric, all bets were off.

He came in the room and scanned the monitors.

“We treat people, not monitors.”  The professor in his head admonished him. He looked down and saw a woman in the corner, standing stoic, her eyes focused on the bed. A nurse was standing next to her, probably explaining what was happening. He’d met the nurse earlier, but couldn’t remember his name.

Then he turned to the bed. The baby was small against the adult bed. Most of the work was done. Heart rate was normal, color was good, respiration’s appeared normal.

“What happened?” David asked.

“That’s what we need to find out.” Dr. Meade said.

***

Okay, in this example, did you start to feel a sense of the movement of the story? What layers could be added to make that more intense? What were the focal points of each scene? How did each character’s emotions influence the scene? How could I have done more of that without slowing the pace?

Revise this and then work on these techniques in your own writing.

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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A Creative Exercise

By Tiffany Colter

We are starting the second quarter of 2014 and after a record breaking cold for the first three months of this year; we’re all ready to go outside. I decided that rather than spend lots of time reading a blog, I’d issue an exercise.

Fiction:

Spend ten minutes in your favorite writing spot writing a story using the prompt below. Set a time so you go no longer than ten minutes.

It hadn’t always been like this. Before the winter hit Sarah had…

 

Non-Fiction:

Imagine someone just contacted you about the topic of your book. This person has the exact issue your book was designed to help. Write a letter to this person letting them know why you wrote this book and what specific features it has that will help them solve their problem or improve their position [based on the topic of your book.]

 

I hope you are ready for a wonderful spring. Start the first day of the second quarter of the year being creative and setting the tone for a year of goals met.

 

I’ll see you next week. I’m going to take the time I usually spend writing my blog to do what I just assigned to you. Leading by example…

 

Tiff

 

Your Coach for the Journey, Tiffany Colter, The Writing Career Coach

Don’t miss a single posting! Subscribe here to receive these postings by e-mail. Tiffany Colter is a writer, speaker and writing career coach who works with beginner to published writers. She can be reached through her website at writingcareercoach.com.

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